Turn your cleaning into a workout that counts

Sometimes the thought of doing exercise can be demotivating. Changing into workout gear, getting ourselves to the gym or pool can feel like an effort. But did you know that doing every day chores can be a way to boost your physical activity levels? And the more physical effort you put into the task the more kilojoules you will burn.

Try these tips to turn your cleaning into a workout that counts:

  1. Clean to music – turn the music up loud and dance whilst you’re cleaning. This makes things a little more enjoyable and will increase your intensity level so you’re burning more energy. If you want to take it a step further, set yourself a challenge to finish the task in a set number of songs and this will surely motivate you to work harder and faster.
  2. Lunge when you vacuum – we mainly use our arms when vacuuming so to turn this into a real workout try performing some walking lunges to give your thighs and buttocks some attention too (make sure you keep your knees directly above your ankles as you lunge forward, your back straight and your core muscles engaged).
  3. Think big movements – for activities like cleaning mirrors, shower screens, windows and glass doors, instead of making small circular movements try and make long swipes up and down instead. Squat with down movements and go up onto your toes for the up movements to give you more of a whole body workout and if you can alternate which arm you use.
  4. Batter up – instead of vacuuming rugs or mats, take them outside, hang them up and beat them with a broom. This will use more muscles and energy than vacuuming them would.

There are lots of ways to get physical activity into your day. It doesn’t matter how you move the most important thing is that you do. Remember, 30 minutes of moderate exercise every day will help you manage your diabetes and improve your overall health and wellbeing.

You don’t need to be an athlete, you just need to move a little more than you did yesterday.

Join our community of over 45,000 people living with diabetes

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